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April 26, 2016

Omega-3s Plus B Vitamins May Help Lower Homocysteine Levels

Filed under: Omega-3 — Emma @ 8:48 am
Emma

Higher levels of the amino acid homocysteine have been linked to lower bone mineral density in women and a higher risk of cardiovascular and neurological disease. A recent study suggests that taking omega-3 supplements may help lower homocysteine levels, and that adding folic acid, vitamin B6, and B12 may enhance omega-3s homocysteine-lowering effects.

For this study, researchers examined data from 13 trials with omega-3 supplementation and 8 trials with omega-3s and B vitamins. The 21 trials had a total of 3,267 participants. They found that supplementation with 0.2 to 6 grams per day of omega-3s was associated with an 8.5% change in homocysteine from the average baseline. They also found that supplementation with omega-3’s plus folic acid and B-group vitamins had a greater effect than omega-3s alone.

The researchers noted that previous studies have shown that the omega-3 fatty acid DHA may promote pathways involved in homocysteine degradation. Additionally, tissue and plasma concentrations of homocysteine have been found to be effected by vitamin B status, as they play a role in homocysteine metabolism.

Researchers from Deakin University conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on April 1, 2016, in Nutrition Research.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including better moods, improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, and aiding your immune system. Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in omega-3s.

Vitamin B12 is a water-soluble vitamin that is essential to the proper function of the brain, nervous system and formation of blood. Deficiencies in vitamin B12 can lead to fatigue, depression and memory lapses. Previous studies have found a link between vitamin B6 and reductions in the risk of stroke, birth defects and hearing loss. B6 also plays an important role in many essential functions in the human body ranging from nervous system function to red blood cell formation.

Folic acid is the synthetic form of folate, a water-soluble B vitamin. Folate plays an essential role in many of the necessary functions of the human body. It has been associated with nervous system function, red blood cell formation, and hormone function. Previous studies have also found a potential link between this vitamin and reductions in hearing loss and birth defects.

Our bodies do not naturally synthesize B vitamins. However, it is easy to increase your intake by eating more vitamin B- rich foods, such as liver, eggs, beans, sunflower seeds, asparagus, leafy green vegetables, oranges, strawberries, cantaloupes, and other melons. Additionally, food sources of vitamin B12 include liver, turkey giblets, oysters, clams, king crab and whole milk. If your diet is not rich in these products, you should consider supplementing with a high quality multivitamin or vitamin B supplement.



March 10, 2016

Prenatal Omega-3 Supplementation Linked to Lower Risk of Anemia in Newborns

Filed under: Omega-3 — Sarah @ 9:00 am
Sarah

Anemia occurs when red blood cells are broken down too rapidly, a person loses too much blood, or their bone marrow isn’t producing enough red blood cells. It can be especially dangerous in babies. A recent study suggests that taking omega-3 supplements while pregnant may lower the risk of anemia in newborns.

Participants in the study included 100 healthy pregnant mothers. The participants were assigned to drink two doses of 200 ml of a control dairy drink or two doses of 200 ml of a fish oil-enriched dairy drink daily. Consumption begab at the 28th week of gestation and continued until delivery. The fish oil was from tuna and contained the omega-3 fatty acid DHA.

The researchers assessed the dietary intake of the mothers via a 110-item food frequency questionnaire and a 72-hour diet record. The researchers used the information gathered from those two sources to create a recommended diet for each woman.

At the conclusion of the study, the researchers found that the omega-3 supplementation was associated with increased iron homeostasis in the part of the uterus that establishes nutrient circulation between the embryo and the mother. This means the fetuses were getting more iron, which decreases their risk of developing anemia when they’re born.

Researchers from the University of Granada and King’s College London conducted the study. It was published in the December 2015 issue of the Journal of Functional Foods.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including better moods, improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in omega-3s. For vegans like the ones in this study or for folks who just don’t like fish, consider taking a daily high quality non-fish supplement that has been tested for purity and potency.



March 1, 2016

Low Levels of Omega-3s May Have Significant Blood Pressure Effects

Filed under: Omega-3 — Emma @ 9:25 am
Emma

High blood pressure is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, one of the leading causes of death in the United States. A recent study suggests that consuming the recommended dietary amounts of omega-3s may help lower systolic blood pressure.

Participants in the study included 312 healthy men and women. They were randomly assigned to receive fish oil containing either 0.7 g of EPA and DHA or 1.8 g of EPA and DHA for eight weeks.

The researchers found no changes in blood pressure for the overall cohort. However, when they looked specifically on people with hypertension, they found that taking the omega-3 supplement was associated with an average 5 mmHg reduction in systolic blood pressure. The results were seen for both doses of the supplement. The researchers noted that a reduction of that level is associated with an approximately 20% reduction in cardiovascular disease in middle age.

This was the first study to find that relatively low doses of omega-3’s can have a significant impact on blood pressure. The majority of previous studies used doses of over 3 grams per day.

Researchers from the Universities of East Anglia, Reading, Southampton, Glasgow, and Newcastle conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on January 27, 2016, in The Journal of Nutrition.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including better moods, improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in omega-3s. For vegans like the ones in this study or for folks who just don’t like fish, consider taking a daily high quality non-fish supplement that has been tested for purity and potency.



January 29, 2016

Higher Omega-3 Index Associated With Improved Attention, Processing Speed in Teens

Filed under: Omega-3 — Emma @ 9:00 am
Emma

The Omega-3 index records the percentage concentration of omega-3 in red blood cells, and provides a good indication of a person’s long-term intake of omega-3s. A recent study suggests that teenagers with a higher Omega-3 index have better information processing speeds when compared with those with a lower Omega-3 index.

Participants in the study included 266 Dutch teens between the ages of 13 and 15. The researchers took blood samples from all of the teens and also assessed cognitive performance via a range of tests.

The participants filled out a fish consumption questionnaire, and it showed that 13.9% of the teens did not consume any fish at all and that 77% of them consumed fish rarely. As a result, the average Omega-3 Index was 3.83%, which was much lower than the recommended 8%-11%.

After examining the data, the researchers found that a higher Omega-3 Index was associated with higher scores on the Letter Digit Substitution Test. Specifically, every 1% increase in the Omega-3 Index was associated with a 1.23 digit increase. They also noted that the students with a higher Omega-3 Index had “fewer errors of omission” on the D2 test of attention, which means that they paid better attention than students with a lower Omega-3 Index.

Researchers from the Open University of the Netherlands, Omegametrix (Germany), Aker BioMarine (Norway), and Maastricht University (The Netherlands) conducted the study. It was published on January 2, 2016, in Nutrients.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including better moods, improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in omega-3s. For vegans like the ones in this study or for folks who just don’t like fish, consider taking a daily high quality non-fish supplement that has been tested for purity and potency.



January 19, 2016

Higher Omega-3 Index Linked To Lower Triglyceride Levels

Filed under: Omega-3 — Sarah @ 9:00 am
Sarah

The omega-3 index is a measure of the fatty acid status of a person. A recent study suggests that a higher omega-3 index may be associated with lower triglyceride levels.

Participants in the study included 276 people with a mean age of 77.6 who took part in the Retirement Health and Lifestyle Study. Participants with the highest omega-3 index had up to 28% lower triglyceride levels than people with the lowest omega-3 index. Participants with the highest index also had a better ratio of total cholesterol to HDL cholesterol.

The researchers noted differences between men and women, including the fact that only the women with the lowest omega-3 index had elevated triglyceride levels.  Additionally, the women in general had significantly higher omega-3 indexes than the men.

Researchers from the University of Newcastle conducted the study. It was published in the January 2016 issue of The Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including better moods, improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in omega-3s. For vegans like the ones in this study or for folks who just don’t like fish, consider taking a daily high quality non-fish supplement that has been tested for purity and potency.



January 18, 2016

Omega-3s May Be Associated With Lower Levels of Depressive Symptoms

Filed under: Omega-3 — Emma @ 9:00 am
Emma

The research regarding the effect of omega-3s on depression has been unclear, however the majority of it has focused on people who consume Western diets with lower fish intake. A recent study suggests that omega-3s may help lower depressive symptoms even in countries with higher fish consumption.

Participants in the study included 1,050 Japanese men and 1,073 Japanese women with an average age of 60. All of the participants were instructed to fast for at least 12 hours. Blood was collected in the early hours of the morning following the fasting. The researchers used the Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale to determine that 266 or 12.5% of the study population had depressive symptoms. Those participants were also significantly more likely to be unmarried, have fewer years of educations, and a higher risk of past stroke when compared with those without depressive symptoms.

The researchers found that that blood concentration of omega-3 was inversely associated with depressive symptoms. Additionally, the researchers noted significant differences in EPA, omega-3 PUFA, and omega-3 long chain PUFA between people with depressive symptoms and those without depressive symptoms. The average omega-3 long chain PUFA concentration of people with depressive symptoms was 264.1 microgram per ml, while the average concentration of people without depressive symptoms was 276.0 microgram per ml.

No association was found between depressive symptoms and omega-6 levels.

Researchers from the Japanese National Centre for Geriatrics and Gerontology, the Aichi Shukutoku University, and the Nagoya University of Arts and Sciences in Japan, as well as Suntory Wellness Limited conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on December 22, 2015 in the British Journal of Nutrition.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including alleviating arthritis pain, better moods, improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in omega-3s. For vegans like the ones in this study or for folks who just don’t like fish, consider taking a daily high quality non-fish supplement that has been tested for purity and potency.



January 5, 2016

People With Higher Omega-3 Levels May Live Longer

Filed under: Omega-3 — Sarah @ 9:00 am
Sarah

Americans tend to have low omega-3s fatty acid levels. According to the Global Organization for EPA and DHA Omega-3s, only 50% of men and 40% of women get the recommended daily amount. That could be bad news for mature adults, as a recent study suggests that people with higher levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids live longer than those with lower levels.

Participants in the study included 2,193 Swedish women and 2,039 Swedish men. The researchers tested their blood for levels of different fats when they were 60 and then followed them for a minimum of 14.5 years. During that time, 484 cardiovascular disease events and 456 all-cause deaths were recorded in people with no prior cardiovascular disease.

The researchers found that higher levels of EPA and DHA fatty acids were associated with lower risks of cardiovascular disease in women, while ALA was associated with moderately increased risk. They also noted an inverse association between EPA and DHA levels and all-cause mortality in all of the participants. Finally, they noted a decreased risk in all-cause mortality in men associated with LA levels.

Researchers from Uppsala University in Sweden conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on June 17, 2015, in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including alleviating arthritis pain, better moods, improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in DHA and EPA omega-3s. T If you don’t like the taste of fish or are just finding it hard to work it into your meal plans, consider taking a high quality supplement. Make sure your supplement is tested for purity and potency.



December 24, 2015

People With Bipolar Disorder May Have Lower Levels of Omega-3’s

Filed under: Omega-3 — Sarah @ 9:00 am
Sarah

Omega-3s are an essential part of cell-to-cell communication in the brain and have also been found to combat inflammation, which previous studies suggest may contribute to depression. A recent study further examined how omega-3s and depression interact and found that people with bipolar disorder may have lower levels of an omega-3 fatty acid that crosses the blood-brain barrier than people without bipolar disorder.

Participants in the study included 27 people with symptomatic bipolar disorder and 31 healthy controls. The researchers measured blood levels of different forms of the polyunsaturated fatty acids omega-3 and omega-6. Additionally, the participants self-reported fatty acid consumption and bipolar medication use.

Free fatty acids can cross the blood-brain barrier but fatty acids that are bound to proteins cannot. The researchers found that the subjects with bipolar disorder had a lower ratio of free-circulating omega-3 fatty acid EPA to protein-bound EPA when compared with people who did not have bipolar disorder. This means that people with bipolar disorder have lower availability of omega-3’s in the body.

The researchers hope that this study will prompt further investigations into omega-3 levels and omega-3 supplementation and depression.

Researchers from Penn State College of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health conducted the study. It was published in the November 2015 issue of the journal Bipolar Disorders.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including alleviating arthritis pain, better moods, improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in DHA and EPA omega-3s. T If you don’t like the taste of fish or are just finding it hard to work it into your meal plans, consider taking a high quality supplement. Make sure your supplement is tested for purity and potency.



November 4, 2015

Krill Oil May Help With Post-Exercise Immune Function

Filed under: Omega-3 — Emma @ 9:00 am
Emma

Vigorous exercise lowers immunity by decreasing the number of natural killer (NK) cells a person is producing. A recent study suggests that taking krill oil supplements may improve the immune function of healthy, exercising adults by increasing the activity of NK cells as well as increasing the production of IL-2 (which regulates the activity of immune cells) in the recovery period after exercise.

Participants in the study included 37 healthy men and women with an average age of 25.8 who were given two grams of krill oil or a placebo daily for six weeks. All of the participants performed a simulated cycling time trial at the onset and conclusion of the study.

The researchers found that the krill oil supplement was associated with a 75% and 21% increase in erythrocyte EPA and DHA levels, respectively, and a 27% increase in the Omega-3 Index. They also noted decreases in arachidonic and docosatetraenoic acid of 7% and 17%, respectively.

Finally, the researchers noted significant increases in the production of PBMC IL-2 and in NK cell activity in the krill oil group during the recovery period. Other cytokines were not affected.

The researchers did not note any effect on heart rate or oxygen consumption.

Researchers from the University of Glasgow conducted the study. It was published on September 25, 2015, in PLoS One.

Krill oil is rich in omega-3s, which have been linked to improved joint mobility, aiding your immune system, and helping with age-related macular degeneration. Previous studies suggest that krill oil may be superior to fish oil in raising omega-3 levels.



October 1, 2015

Eating More Fish May Help Reduce the Risk of Depression

Filed under: Omega-3 — Emma @ 9:09 am
Emma

Depression affects as many as 350 million people worldwide. A recent study suggests that eating high amounts of fish may help reduce the risk of developing depression.

Researchers examined databases for relevant studies and found 101 articles containing relevant studies. Of those, 16 were eligible for inclusion in their analysis. There were 26 studies included in those 16 articles, for a total of 150,278 participants.

Ten of the studies included were cohort studies, meaning the researchers monitored people who didn’t have depression at the beginning of the study in order to measure how many participants developed it. The other studies were cross-sectional, meaning they examined the association between depression and other variables at a single point in time or over a specific, brief period.

Ten of the studies included participants from Europe, seven were from North America, and the remainder were from Asia, Oceania, and South America.

After examining all of the data, the researchers found a 17% reduction in risk of depression in the participants who ate the most fish when compared with those who ate the least. This finding held true for both cohort and cross-sectional studies.

When the researchers controlled for gender, they found that men had a 20% reduced risk of depression while women had a slightly lower reduced risk of 16%.

The researchers cautioned that no definitive conclusions could be drawn from the data. They did however suggest that the association could be due to the fact that the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish have been shown to alter the microstructure of brain membranes and change the activity of the neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin. They also suggested that the high quality protein, vitamins, and minerals found in fish may help combat depression or that eating a lot of fish may be associated with a healthier and more nutritious diet in general.

Researchers from Qingdao University in China conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on September 10, 2015, in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

More and more research is showing that fish consumption is extremely important to maintaining good health, especially as we age. Many of these studies have linked the positive health benefits of fish to their omega-3 fatty acid content. Omega-3 fatty acids have been associated with benefits ranging from improved heart health, better moods, improved joint mobility, and aiding your immune system.

If you don’t like the taste of fish or are concerned about the mercury levels present in some fish, try adding a high quality supplement to your daily routine. Make sure, however, that your supplement has been tested for potency and purity in order to get the most out investment.



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