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August 26, 2015

Omega-3 Supplements May Help Muscle Function and Mass in Older Adults

Filed under: Omega-3 — Sarah @ 9:15 am
Sarah

As we age, we naturally have a decrease in muscle function and muscle mass, but steps can be taken to combat that. A recent study has found that fish oil-derived omega-3 supplements may improve muscle function and muscle mass in healthy mature adults.

Participants in the study included sixty men and women between the ages of 60 and 85. They were given 3.6 g EPA/DHA of fish oil-derived omega-3s or a placebo in the form of corn oil. They took their pills daily for six months.

In order to assess muscle function and muscle mass, the researchers measured muscle volume, handgrip strength, one-repetition maximum lower and upper body strength, and average power during isokinetic leg exercises at the beginning and the end of the study.

At the conclusion of the study, the researchers noted that body weight, total body fat mass, and inter-muscular fat content was not significantly affected by the omega-3 supplements. However, they did note a significant increase in thigh muscle volume, handgrip strength, and one-repetition muscle strength in the omega-3 group. One-repetition muscle strength is a composite score for leg press, chest press, knee extension, and knee flexion.

The researchers recommended that fish oil-derived omega-3s be included in therapeutic approaches aimed at preventing sarcopenia and helping older adults maintain muscle function and independence.

Researchers from the Center for Human Nutrition at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, MO, conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on May 20, 2015, in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including alleviating arthritis pain, better moods, improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in DHA and EPA omega-3s. T If you don’t like the taste of fish or are just finding it hard to work it into your meal plans, consider taking a high quality supplement. Make sure your supplement is tested for purity and potency.



July 22, 2015

Brain Health Benefits of B Vitamins Shown to Be Dependent on Omega-3 Levels

Filed under: Omega-3,Vitamin B — Sarah @ 9:41 am
Sarah

Previous studies have shown that B vitamin supplements may support brain health by reducing brain tissue loss, but the results have not always been consistent.  In a new study of individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), those given B vitamin supplements and who already had high blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids experienced a 40% slowdown in brain atrophy. On the other hand, those who had low omega-3s at the outset, did not experience a benefit from B vitamin supplementation.

Participants in the study included 168 people over the age of 70. They were given a placebo or a vitamin B supplement containing 0.8 mg folic acid, 20 mg B6, and 0.5 mg B12 every day for two years.

 

At the conclusion of the study, the researchers found that found that participants with the highest average omega-3 levels at the start of the study — levels higher than 590 micromoles per liter — had a 40% slower rate of brain atrophy when compared with the placebo group. They did not observe any association between the lowest average omega-3 levels, those that were less than 390 micromoles per liter, and brain atrophy.

 

The researchers also found a link between B vitamins, omega-3s, and homocysteine levels. The results of their study showed that a sufficient level of vitamin B and low homocysteine levels are needed for the optimal utilization and distribution of omega-3 fatty acids. Homocysteine is an amino acid that has been linked to suspected or confirmed dementia.

 

The researchers concluded that pre-existing levels of plasma omega-3 fatty acids in the body to be high enough to enable vitamin B to counteract brain atrophy. This would explain why some studies looking at vitamin B and brain health have found no link.

 

Researchers from the University of Oxford and other universities conducted the study. It was published in the July 2015 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

 

B vitamins have been linked to numerous health benefits, including improving breast health, nervous system function, red blood cell formation, and hormone function. Studies have also suggested that B vitamins may reduce the risk of hearing loss, and birth defects

 

Our bodies do not naturally synthesize B vitamins. However, it is easy to increase your intake by eating more folate- rich foods. Some foods rich in folate include liver, eggs, beans, sunflower seeds, asparagus, leafy green vegetables, oranges, strawberries, cantaloupes, and other melons. B  vitamin intake also can be bolstered through supplements or fortified foods.

 

Omega-3s have also been linked to a number of health benefits, including improving joint health, heart health and eye health and boosting moods and immune system function.

 

Like B vitamins, omega-3s are not found naturally in the human body, so it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in DHA and EPA omega-3s. T If you dont like the taste of fish or are just finding it hard to work it into your meal plans, consider taking a high quality supplement. Make sure your supplement is tested for purity and potency.

 



July 14, 2015

Omega-3s May Improve Endurance in Athletes

Filed under: Exercise,Omega-3 — Sarah @ 9:59 am
Sarah

Athletes often want to push their bodies as far as they can go, but sometimes their bodies aren’t quite up to the task. A recent study suggests that omega-3s derived from seal oil may help improve neuromuscular function and fatigue in athletes.

Participants in the study included 30 male athletes with an average age of 25 who were already training for an average 17 hours per week. They were given either the seal oil supplement, containing 375 mg EPA, 230 mg DPA, and 510 mg DHA, or a placebo daily for three weeks.

At the conclusion of the study, the seal oil group had increases in blood EPA levels but no changes were noted in DPA and DHA levels. They also had a 20% increase in thigh muscle function as measured by vastus lateralis electromyography and reduced fatigue, when compared with the placebo.

The researchers also administered the Wingate test, an anaerobic test used to measure peak anaerobic power and anaerobic capacity. Participants in the seal oil group had a 3.4% lower power drop than those in the placebo group.

The difference in performance was not clear. The omega-3 group had a 50% improvement, while the placebo group had a 33% improvement.

Researchers from the University of Toronto conducted the study. It was published on June 18, 2015, in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including alleviating arthritis pain, better moods, improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in DHA and EPA omega-3s. T If you don’t like the taste of fish or are just finding it hard to work it into your meal plans, consider taking a high quality supplement. Make sure your supplement is tested for purity and potency.



July 9, 2015

Omega-3s May Help Reduce Symptoms of Computer-Related Dry Eye

Filed under: Omega-3 — Sarah @ 11:43 am
Sarah

Computers have become a part of most people’s daily lives, but they can pose certain health risks such as dry eye. A recent study suggests that omega-3 supplements may help improve symptoms of dry eye associated with prolonged exposure to computer screens.

Dry eye is a disorder of the tear film due to tear deficiency or excessive tear evaporation, which causes damage to the interpalpebral ocular surface.

Participants in the study included 478 people with dry eye who were using computers for at least three hours per day for a minimum of one year. They were given either daily omega-3 supplements that included 360 mg EPA and 240 mg DHA or a placebo in the form of olive oil daily for three months.

The researchers recorded dry eye symptoms, the Nelson grade, Schirmer test, tear breakup time (TBUT), and conjunctival impression cytology. The Nelson grade measures the severity of dry eye, and the Schirmer test is used to determine if the eye is producing enough tears to keep it moist.

At the conclusion of the study, the omega-3 group had significant improvements in dry eye symptoms, the Nelson grade, the Schirmer test, and TBUT scores. The researchers pointed out that this suggests that omega-3s may help with inherent tear film stability, rather than merely increasing tear volume and production.

Researchers from the Laser Eye Clinic in Noida conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on February 16, 2015, in the journal Contact Lens and Anterior Eye.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including alleviating arthritis painbetter moods, improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in DHA and EPA omega-3s.



June 19, 2015

Fish Oil Combined With Strength Training May Boost Immunity in Older Adults

Filed under: Omega-3 — Sarah @ 4:19 pm
Sarah

Our immune system gets weaker as we age, making mature adults more vulnerable to infectious, chronic degenerative, autoimmune and malignant disease. A recent study has found that a combination of fish oil and strength training may help mature adults boost their immunity.

Participants in the study included 45 women with an average age of 64. They were assigned to one of three groups: strength training alone for 90 days, strength training with 2 g of fish oil daily for 90 days, or 2 g fish oil for 60 days followed by strength training and fish oil for 90 days. The fish oil contained 180 g EPA and 120 g DHA per kilogram. The strength training occurred three times per week and included floor and upright hip, leg, knee, and foot exercises.

A number of innate and adaptive immune parameters were assessed at baseline, before training and after training.

Strength training alone produced no changes in the immune system. On the other hand, both groups taking the fish oil experienced significant improvements in two markers used to asses immune system function.

The first was Cytokine IL-2, which is a protein that regulates the activities of the white blood cells that are responsible for immunity. Cytokine IL-2 production was increased by 80% with the fish oil supplementation, and 85% with supplementation plus exercise.

The second was IFN-g, a cytokine that is critical for innate and adaptive immunity against viral and some bacterial and protozoal infections. IFN-g was increased by 60% with fish oil and 88% when the fish oil was combined with exercise.

What’s more, fish oil supplementation helped to boost the immune system by increasing white blood cell function, and increasing the number of CD4r and CD8r lymphocytes and lymphocyte cytokines. CD4r and CD8r lymphocytes fight against infections and lymphocyte cytokines are proteins responsible for cell signaling in the immune system

Researchers from Paraná Federal University and the Pequeno Principe Research Institute in Brazil conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on June 10, 2015, in the British Journal of Nutrition.

Fish oil has also been linked to numerous other health benefits, including combating diabetes, lowering cholesterol, improving vision, reducing the risk of dementia and relieving depression.

If you’re looking to increase your fish oil intake, try adding darker fish, such as salmon or tuna, to your diet. If you don’t like the taste of fish or are just finding it hard to work it into your meal plans, consider taking a high quality supplement. Make sure your supplement is tested for purity and potency.



June 12, 2015

Salmon Oil May Help Lower Markers of Oxidative Stress

Filed under: Omega-3 — Emma @ 4:28 pm
Emma

Oxidative stress is basically an imbalance between the production of free radicals and the ability of the body to counteract or detoxify their harmful effects through neutralization by antioxidants. A recent study suggests that supplements of salmon oil may help lower markers of oxidative stress.

Participants in the study included 160 healthy adults with an average age of 59.3. Over the course of 16 weeks they were given either a placebo, three grams of salmon oil plus a multivitamin, six grams of salmon oil plus a multivitamin, or 6 grams of salmon oil. The six-gram supplement contained 480 mg of EPA and 480 mg of DHA omega-3s.

At the conclusion of the study, the researchers noted significantly lower F2-isoprostane levels in both of the six gram groups. F2-isopropostanes are created when fats are peroxidized. They are considered to be the most reliable biomarkers of in vivo lipid peroxidative damage. The decreases in F2-isopropostane levels were also associated with higher PUFA           levels in the participant’s red blood cells.

There were no changes seen in the three-gram group and no significant difference between the two six gram groups. Additionally, there was no notable effect on inflammation seen in any of the groups.

Researchers from the Swinburne University of Technology in Australia conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on November 21, 2014, in the Journal of Functional Foods.

Salmon oil has high levels of omega-3s. Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including alleviating arthritis pain, improved mood, improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in DHA and EPA omega-3s.



June 5, 2015

Omega-3 May Improve Cognitive Flexibility in People at Risk of Alzheimer’s

Filed under: Omega-3 — Emma @ 7:53 am
Emma

Cognitive flexibility refers to the mental ability to efficiently switch between thinking about two different concepts, and to think about multiple concepts simultaneously. A recent study suggests that a higher consumption of omega-3 fatty acids may help with improved cognitive flexibility in adults who are at risk of late onset Alzheimer’s disease.

Previous studies have suggested that cognitive flexibility and other executive functions may better predict daily functioning than memory does. These executive functions tend to decline earlier than other functions in aging.

Participants in the study included 40 cognitively healthy older adults who were between the ages of 65 and 75. All were carriers of the gene variant APOE e4, which is known to contribute to late-onset Alzheimer’s. The researchers tested the participant’s cognitive flexibility and measured their brains using MRI. They also performed cognitive flexibility tests.

The participants with higher blood levels of omega-3s performed better on the cognitive flexibility tests than those with lower levels. They also had a bigger anterior cingulate cortex compared to their lower omega-3 peers. The anterior cingulate cortex is the region of the brain that is known to contribute to cognitive flexibility.

Researchers from the University of Illinois conducted the study. It was published on May 21, 2015, in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including alleviating arthritis pain, better moods, improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in DHA and EPA omega-3s.



June 4, 2015

Omega-3s May Help Slow Age-Related Muscle Decline

Filed under: Omega-3 — Sarah @ 3:30 pm
Sarah

Both muscle mass and function decline as we age, typically starting in the 40’s and then increasing after age 50. A recent study suggests that supplements of omega-3s derived from fish oil may help slow that decline.

Participants in the study included 60 healthy older people between the ages of 60 and 85. Over the course of six months, they were given either a supplement containing 1.86 g of EPA and 1.5 g of DHA or a control in the form of corn oil. Forty-four of the participants completed the study.

The researchers found that the omega-3 group had a 3.6% increase in thigh muscle volume, a 5 pound increase in handgrip strength, and a 4% increase in maximum lower and upper body strength when compared with the control group. The difference in muscle volume was approximately 3.5% and the difference in muscle strength was approximately 6%.

The researchers noted that these results are lower than what is reported from exercise training but more than reported from testosterone, growth hormone, or dehydroepiandrosterone therapy in older adults.

Researchers from the Center for Human Nutrition and the Program in Physical Therapy conducted the study. It was published on May 20, 2015, in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including alleviating arthritis pain, better moods, improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in DHA and EPA omega-3s.



May 22, 2015

Omega-3s May Boost Blood Flow, Performance in Athletes

Filed under: Omega-3 — Sarah @ 3:56 pm
Sarah

A recent study suggests that supplements of omega-3 may increase nitric oxide in the blood and increase blood flow, leading to better exercise performance in cyclists.

Participants in the study included 13 elite cyclists who were given either 1.3 g of omega-3s or a placebo daily for three weeks. At the conclusion of the study, the researchers noted an average increase in nitric oxide levels of 9.6 micromoles per liter in the omega-3 group, while the placebo group showed increases of only 1.4 micromoles per liter.

The researchers also noted a 5.25% increase in flow-mediated dilation in the omega-3 group. This was associated with notable increases in maximal oxygen intake when compared with the placebo.

Researchers from the Academy of Physical Education in Katowice and the Medical University of Silesia conducted the study. It was published in the June 2015 issue of the European Journal of Sports Sciences.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including alleviating arthritis painbetter moods, improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in DHA and EPA omega-3s.



May 8, 2015

Omega-3 Supplemented Infant Formula Increases Long Term Growth

Filed under: Omega-3 — Sarah @ 9:00 am
Sarah

A recent study suggests that infant formula supplemented with omega-3 fatty acids may lead to longer and heavier children when compared with an infant formula that did not include omega-3 fatty acids.

Participants in the study included 69 infants who were raised from birth on formula. Fifty-nine of the babies were given a formula that included a long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid supplement, while the other 15 were given a control formula. They were fed these formulas for the first 12 months of their lives.

The researchers followed up with the children when they were six years old and found that the omega-3 group had higher length, stature, and weight-for-age percentiles from birth to 6 years of age when compared with the control group. However, the supplemented group did not have a higher BMI percentile compared to the control group.

They also found that the children of mothers who smoked had smaller length and stature, regardless of whether they took the omega-formula or the control. Those children also had higher BMIs.

Finally, the researchers noted that males had greater increases in stature associated with the supplemented formula when compared with females.

Researchers from the University of Kansas Medical Center and the University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on April 18, 2015, in the journal PLEFA.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including alleviating arthritis pain, better moods, improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in DHA and EPA omega-3s.



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